• Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin might be right for you.  A clinical study showed that the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin safely clears the Human Papillomavirus (HPV).  

  • No. Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin is not a drug.

    Many, even experts, don’t understand the concept of a drug. For instance, according to the Science Museum website: “A drug is any chemical you take that affects the way your body works. Alcohol, caffeine, aspirin and nicotine are all drugs.” This definition emphasizes the physiological effect of the substance.  However, foods are also chemicals, and they also affect the way the body works.  Since foods are not drugs, this definition is wrong.

    The correct definition is different. A drug is a substance that was labeled as a drug by an official authority.  In the USA this authority is the FDA. Note that this is a legal definition, not a physiological definition!  A drug is a substance that was evaluated by the FDA, and was labeled as a drug.  This evaluation officially determined that the substance is safe, and that it has a specific positive physiological effect on a patient suffering from a specific disease.

    This definition raises an interesting question.  Is a substance that is safe, and that has a strong positive physiological effect on a patient, but was not evaluated by the FDA, a drug? The answer is “No!” Why not? Because it was not evaluated by the FDA!  It is safe. It works. But … the FDA did not issue a licence to this substance, a licence that (a) allows the seller to call it a drug, and (b) specifies what the seller can say (and cannot say) about it!  In other words, the FDA is a government agency that acts as a censor of words!

    Consider the following definition of a censor: “An official who examines material that is about to be released, such as books, movies, news, and art, and suppresses any parts that are considered obscene, politically unacceptable, or a threat to security.”  Translate this to the case of the FDA: “An official who examines a substance that is about to be sold to the public, and suppresses any words that are considered unacceptable, or a threat to the consumer’s health.”

    Let us return to Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin.  Is Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin a drug? No. Is it safe and effective? Absolutely.

    P.S. Note that the website includes the disclaimer: “These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.”  Adding this disclaimer to the label of a dietary supplement is required by the Code of Federal Regulation in the USA.  We argue that this disclaimer is somewhat misleading.  It should say that “These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.” The revised disclaimer is consistent with the following requirement: “… it is unlawful under the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. § 41 et seq., to advertise that a product can prevent, treat, or cure human disease unless you possess competent and reliable scientific evidence, including, when appropriate, well-controlled human clinical studies, substantiating that the claims are true at the time they are made.”  In the Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin case, there are “well-controlled human clinical studies, substantiating that the claims are true at the time they are made.”  It is obvious, that only the revised disclaimer is consistent with both the Code of Federal Regulation and the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. § 41 et seq.

    If we return to the FDA as a licensing agency of words (see above), the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. § 41 et seq. teaches us that the FDA has no monopoly on this licensing.  Another licensing agency is the scientific community.  As it turns out, according to the FTC act, if the scientific community determined that a substance has “well-controlled human clinical studies, substantiating that the claims are true at the time they are made, than this determination actually constitutes a licence to the seller to legally make disease claims!

    On a personal note, we believe that the only disclaimer that all dietary supplements should include on their label is the one saying that “These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.” The reason is simple.  A dietary supplement can legally make disease claims without being approved by the FDA, if these claims are substantiated by clinical studies.  This means that FDA approval is not required to legally make disease claims!

  • Gene-Eden-VIR and Novirin have the same formula, which consists of five natural ingredients: 25 mg of a licorice extract, 150 mg of a quercetin extract, 150 mg of a green tea extract, 50 mg of a cinnamon extract, and 100 mcg of a form of selenium.  The difference between the two products is that Novirin has higher quality, more expensive ingredients. Gene-Eden-VIR was launched at the end of 2009, and Novirin in 2014.

  • The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) tested Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin in several clinical studies that followed the FDA guidelines. After completing the studies, the CBCD published the results in important medical journals.  

    The first clinical study was published in 2013 in the medical journal Pharmacology and Pharmacy. The study showed that Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin has antiviral properties. According to the study: “…the clinical study showed that Gene-Eden-VIR is a safe and effective treatment against the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) … .” (Click here to read the full study.)

    Another clinical study was published in the medical journal Drug Design, Development and Therapy on March 3, 2017. The study showed that Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin cleared the human papillomavirus (HPV) in individuals suffering from a symptomatic HPV infection without any adverse effects. (Click here to read the full study.)

  • Many doctors prescribe Gene-Eden-VIR and Novirin to their patients. See, for instance, the following four prescriptions for Gene-Eden-VIR (some information was blacked out to protect the privacy of the people involved).

    Many would argue that doctors don’t like herbal treatments. These prescriptions show that this is not true.  Doctors like, and even prescribe, herbal treatments that were properly tested.  

    To conclude, if you are unsure about taking Gene-Eden, we recommend you show our clinical studies to your doctor and ask whether our product is right for you. .

  • No other supplement has a published clinical study that tested its safety and efficacy in treating HPV infected people.  Why is this important? Since doctors and healthcare professionals only trust clinical studies. They don’t trust stories, testimonials, information in forums, etc. 

  • Gene-Eden-VIR and Novirin are patented botanical systemic treatments. The Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin formula consists of five natural ingredients: 25 mg of a licorice extract, 150 mg of a quercetin extract, 150 mg of a green tea extract, 50 mg of a cinnamon extract, and 100 mcg of a form of selenium.  

  • It takes 4-6 weeks from the time you start taking Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin to time you start seeing results. Unlike some drugs, the changes with the natural remedy are gradual, and sometimes easily missed.

    You should not stop taking Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin. If you stop, your symptoms may come back or get worse. As a natural product that was shown to have no side effects, it is suitable for long term use.

    Since 1 bottle will last for 1 month, we recommend you order 2 bottles of Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin.

    Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin includes five natural ingredients: a green tea extract, a quercetin extract, a licorice extract, a cinnamon extract, and a form of selenium. The Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin formula is patent protected.

  • The clinical study showed that 100% of the people who took Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin cleared the virus after 12 months treatment.  This means that you need to take the herbal treatment for 1 year. As a natural product that was shown to have no side effects, it is suitable for long term use.

  • We have no reports of any side effects.

  • No. We do not recommend Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin for pregnant women. Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin was not tested in pregnant women, and the effects of the product during pregnancy in unknown. If you already take the supplement, we recommend you stop taking it before getting pregnant, and start taking again after you deliver your baby.

  • polyDNA scientists developed Gene-Eden-VIR and  Novirin. The Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin formula is the first product of its Computer-Intuition-Based R&D process. To identify the Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin ingredients, the scientists used Computer Intuition, a proprietary bioinformatics-based computer program developed by Dr. Hanan Polansky, to analyze thousands of scientific papers. The analysis identified safe and effective natural antiviral compounds. Some of the laboratory and clinical studies that show the strong antiviral effect of these compounds are described here.

  • If the website claims that the dietary supplement “prevents,” “treats,” or “cures” a disease, or it claims that the dietary supplement can be used instead of a drug, or it claims that the dietary supplement decreases a side effect of a drug, then….

    …then, this website is breaking the law.

    Unless….

    Unless the company that sells the dietary supplement possesses “competent and reliable scientific evidence, including, when appropriate, well-controlled human clinical studies, substantiating that the claims are true at the time they are made.” (The quote is taken from the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Act, 15 U.S.C. § 41).

    Reliable scientific evidence is evidence found in peer-reviewed papers published in scientific or medical journals. Information found in newspapers, magazines, forums, and other types of general media is NOT reliable scientific evidence. The most reliable scientific evidence is a report of a clinical study that tested the safety and efficacy of the supplement. If the company doesn’t have this type of evidence, then, according to the FDA, the claim made by the company is “falsely claiming to treat or prevent” a disease or a symptom of a disease.

    To summarize, without reliable scientific evidence, the claim is false, and you should not believe it

  • Some companies that sell dietary supplements list studies that tested the ingredients, but not the supplement itself. For example, a dietary supplement may include an extract of Shiitake Mushroom, together with other ingredients. The website lists a scientific study that shows that the Shiitake Mushroom extract has some beneficial effect. This is valuable information.

    However, much more valuable is a published clinical study that tested the dietary supplement itself, that is, the entire formula with all its ingredients at the doses taken by the users. A clinical study that tested the treatment itself is the gold standard of the medical community.

    To summarize, the relevancy of the evidence should determine the level of trust. More relevant evidence means more trust. Less relevant evidence, such studies on animals, or studies that tested only some of the ingredients, or studies that used much higher or lower dosages, mean less trust in the claims made on the website. The most trusted evidence is a published clinical study that tested the dietary supplement itself.

  • When a dietary supplement has many ingredients, the capsule includes a very low concentration of each ingredient. After all, a capsule has a limited space. A basic principle, known to every biologist, is that an ingredient has to be taken at a certain concentration to have an effect. At lower concentrations, the ingredient will have no effect (and at a too high of a concentration, it can be toxic!). This means that a dietary supplement loaded with many ingredients will most likely have no beneficial effect.

    To summarize, be very skeptical when you see a dietary supplement loaded with many ingredients! Again, before you trust the claims make by the seller, ask to see a published clinical study.

  • Yes. See main menu.

    Many companies post customer testimonials on their website. However, it is important to note that it is illegal to post customer testimonials that use words like “prevent,” “treat,” or “cure” on a company website without supporting relevant scientific evidence.  See discussion above.

    It is also important to remember that, in many cases, these customer testimonials, and many customer testimonials found in forums, are fake. Many “customer testimonials,” which recommend the product are written by the company itself, and therefore are fake. Also, many “customer testimonials,” which criticize the product, are written by competitors, and therefore are also fake.

    That fact alone should tell you to carefully scrutinize customer testimonials.

    Even when you read a customer testimonial that you are sure was written by a real customer, you should still be very skeptical. Consider a case where a customer says that the dietary supplement did not work. Why didn’t it work? Is it because the supplement is ineffective? Or is it because the customer did not follow directions, such as taking it for one month instead of two, taking it every now and then instead of every day, taking it once a day instead of two, etc.

    In summary, since there is no way to know who wrote the testimonials and why, we strongly suggest to look for additional sources of information, such as clinical studies that were published in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

  • Topical treatments, such as creams, foams, gels, lotions, or ointments, can be effective in targeting the active HPV locally in the abnormal growth. However, unlike Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin, topical treatments are ineffective against the latent HPV. They are also ineffective in targeting the viruses elsewhere in your body.

  • The warning letter was sent to polyDNA on April 28, 2011. See here. The issues mentioned in this letter were considered, and according to Lilac Corp’s attorneys, the Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin website is in full compliance with the requirements of the FDA and FTC.

    Note that the letter warns against using particular words or claims on the websites, which were found at the addresses gene-eden.com and polydna.com. These websites are no longer available.

    The warning letter does NOT make any statements against the Gene-Eden-VIR product itself, against the ingredients, or against the label on the bottle.

    Consider the following section from the letter (see underlined words):

    “This is to advise you that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has reviewed your websites at the internet addresses, www.polyDNA.com and www.gene-eden.com in March 2011. FDA has determined that the product “Gene-Eden” is promoted for conditions that cause the product to be a drug under section 201(g)(1)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) [21 U.S.C. § 321(g)(1)(B)]. The therapeutic claims on your website establish that the product is a drug because it is intended for use in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease. The marketing of the product with these claims violates the Act.”

    In other words, the FDA letter does not warn the public against the Gene-Eden-VIR product. It only warns the public against certain wordings on the gene-eden.com and polydna.com websites.

    But even the legal argument against these wordings is unfounded.

    Please also note the phrase “The therapeutic claims on your website establish that the product is a drug because it is intended for use in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease.”

    According to Lilac Corp’s attorneys, the officials at both the FDA and FTC erred in their legal arguments. The original websites at the adresses gene-eden.com and polydna.com said that the Gene-Eden product targets latent viruses. Note the word latent. Even according to the FDA itself, a latent virus is not a disease. See the following quote from the FDA website:

    “Some viruses, however, can enter a state known as latency in which the virus is not being replicated. In the latent state, the virus does not cause disease.”

    So, since a latent virus is not a disease, the Gene-Eden product, unlike what the FDA says in its warning letter, “The therapeutic claims on your website (DO NOT) establish that the product is a drug because it is intended for use in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease.” And therefore, “The marketing of the product with these claims (DOES NOT) violates the Act.”

    The letter also explains why the wordings on the original website “violate the Act.” It says that the claims made on the website are not supported by scientific evidence (see underlined words).

    “In addition, it is unlawful under the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. § 41 et seq., to advertise that a product can prevent, treat, or cure human disease unless you possess competent and reliable scientific evidence, including, when appropriate, well-controlled human clinical studies, substantiating that the claims are true at the time they are made.” Recently, two clinical studies were published in the medical journal Pharmacology and Pharmacy that provide “competent and reliable scientific evidence substantiating” that the claims that Gene-Eden-VIR decreases symptoms of a viral infection are true. See first and second clinical study here and here.

  • Gene-Eden-VIR was launched at the end of 2009, and Novirin in 2014.

  • Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin is not an antibiotic.  But it has an antibiotic-like effect.

    Most drugs target symptoms.  Antibiotics are different.  Antibiotics target the cause of the disease, and as a result, cure the disease.  Almost all other drugs, such as those that lower cholesterol or blood pressure, target symptoms.  These drugs don’t cure the disease.  They reduce symptoms, for a while.  But because of their short term effect, patients need to take them again and again, for life.  Unlike these drugs, patients take antibiotics for a limited time, and clear the infection.  The effect of antibiotics is so remarkable, that Dr. Friedman and Dr. Friedland list antibiotics as one of “Medicine’s 10 Greatest Discoveries.”  Recently, the Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) announced the publication of a clinical study that showed that Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin has an antibiotic-like effect on viruses.

    Antibiotics completely clear the bacteria in infected individuals.  The published clinical study shows that, amazingly, Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin, like antibiotics, completely clears the human papillomavirus (HPV) in infected individuals.  After 12 months treatment, 100% of the participants in the study were HPV free vs. only 53%, 52%, 65%, 20%, and 77% in the five untreated groups.  In other words, within a year, Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin completely wiped out the virus!  In contrast, 23%-80% of the untreated participants were still infected.  Currently, there are no treatments that get rid of latent viruses, and specifically, the latent human papillomavirus (HPV).  Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin is the first of its kind.

    The study was published in the leading peer-reviewed medical journal Drug Design, Development and Therapy.  The paper is available at: https://www.dovepress.com/human-papillomavirus-hpv-systemic-treatment-with-gene-eden-virnovirin–peer-reviewed-article-DDDT.  The paper is indexed on Pubmed.com.  The study is also explained in a video with Dr. Hanan Polansky and Dr. Edan Itzkovitz, see https://youtu.be/Rltv7zFvX-0.

    According to Dr. Hanan Polansky, the lead author of the study, “When I first saw the results, I was shocked.  Doctors tell you that it is impossible to get rid of a latent virus.  Once you are infected, you are infected for life.  Well, our results say: ‘Hold on a second!  This universal belief is wrong.’  Our study shows that there is a way to get rid of a latent virus!”